Randy Auxier on Tenure

Posted: November 10, 2011 in Commentary, Context, Quotes
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Question: Randy, can you explain why the concept of tenure is so important to teachers in universities? I understand somewhat its origins in the 60s and 70s and the desire of teachers to speak freely, but what makes teachers different than other professions?

Answer: Tenure is much older than the 60s or 70s. It goes back to the teens. The troubles began in the 1890s when college faculty members were routinely fired for advocating unpopular (often new, often true) ideas. There were a number of cases, such as Sheldon who was fired from Boston University for unpopular views on the Bible, and culminating in a series of cases in the teens. The American Association of University Professors formed to advocate the value to a free society of protections for persons who were likely to be generating ideas that were uncomfortable to those benefiting from the status quo. The institution of tenure was devised to protect academic freedom. It isn’t a perfect plan, far from it. But a free society requires some ways of safe-guarding the free flow of ideas among those who have earned the right through diligence, productivity, loyalty to their institutions and students, to enjoy some protection for speaking the truth as they see it. That protection now traditionally belongs to tenured university and college faculty members, among whom I am to be counted. Assuming I live a morally acceptable life beyond the academy, and that I perform my assigned duties, I can express my opinions within my discipline without fear of reprisal for their being controversial, or threatening to the beneficiaries of current received opinion, or even if those views are radically out of line with what is now regarded as knowledge. Knowing me as you do, it may not surprise you to learn that I say unpopular things that could get me fired if I were not protected, but I do not say them to stand out; I say what I honestly believe, and I expect to have those views tolerated and never censored. I have earned the right to this protection, and unlike most people, I earned it twice, at different institutions. I do not take my speech lightly, and I intent to do whatever is within my power to insure that people like me, who have earned this kind of protection, are still able to speak their minds without fear of petty or unjustified reprisal, in the future. As Sarah says above, if they can stifle me in Illinois, at a public institution, they can much more easily stifle people in benighted places like Oklahoma. (I speak from extensive first-hand knowledge.) Our struggle here will have implications all over the nation. Illinois has the best labor law in the country, from a worker’s point of view. If we can’t protect tenure, no one can. You asked.

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Comments
  1. As much as I love you guys in regard to your work, I just want to clarify my views in regard to the methods of the strike. James 5:9 actually states that, “The Judge is standing at the door!” (NIV) This means that the judge that stood at the door during Passover when God made a separation between Egypt and Israel is still present at the Lord’s Supper and still judges between people because the Lord’s Supper was instituted upon Passover. The point is that just as Noah built the ark and condemned the world, (Hebrews 11:7) so too all that people need to do is to simply bring their disputes before God in such a way that a priest would simply just petition God for a separation between people. When God thus withdraws his loving kindness from his enemies, then even the first born of Egypt are struck dead. The point is that if you are on God’s side, then he can easily destroy your enemies and their work by God’s government on earth as seen in the church and through the cup of God’s justice. Having said this I will leave you with a question to think about, “What if God, although choosing to show his wrath and make his power known, bore with great patience the objects of his wrath—prepared for destruction?” – Romans 9:22 (NIV)

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